LAB501

Supermicro C7Z87-OCE Review

BIOS

 

Although the BIOS is UEFI, its interface has the old keyboard driven classical look but this isn’t a problem for me so I took out my Canon 40D and took some photos for you to see how it looks. I like the design and the responsiveness but I must complain about the spreading of overclocking options, it’s pretty difficult to find and change something fast, it’s not intuitive at all.

We can change the processor speed using one of the seven ready made profiles (4.2GHz, 4.3GHz, 4.4GHz, 4.5GHz, 4.6GHz, 4.7GHz and 4.8GHz) but also manually. For overclocking we can find all the necessary settings in the BIOS, from a first look only the load-line calibration setting seems to be absent.

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In the memory tab we can set an XMP profile if the installed module has one or we can set it manually. We have no profiles and we must set all the parameters at once if we opt for manual settings. I would have preferred to have the possibility to set just the main timings and the secondary timings to be set on Auto. The tertiary timings are not event present in the BIOS so we can’t set them at all.

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The monitoring of temperatures and voltages is good and pretty accurate. We have just one profile to save our BIOS setting, pretty poor for an “overclocking” motherboard if you ask me. First thing that I wanted to do was to update the BIOS but guess what? You can’t do that from the BIOS, so I lost about 30 minutes until I finally managed to complete this task. Why, you ask? Because the procedure is pretty complicated and involves jumpers, an USB drive and a very creative guy!

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2 comments la: Supermicro C7Z87-OCE Review

    1. roguesmci wrote on:

      Nice, when will you review C7Z97-OCE ?

      Reply
      1. matose Post author wrote on:

        When we will receive it 🙂

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